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Influenza Literature - Latest PubMed Articles

Overview of latest articles and publications on ebola in PubMed. PubMed is a service of the US National Library of Medicine that includes over 18 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals.


  • Metal-Based Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Infectious Diseases.
    Metal-Based Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Infectious Diseases. [Journal Article, Review]Molecules 2017 Aug 18; 22(8)MAderibigbe BA Infectious diseases can be transmitted and they cause a significant burden on public health globally. They are the greatest world killers and it is estimated that they are responsible for the demise of...Infectious diseases can be transmitted and they cause a significant burden on public health globally. They are the greatest world killers and it is estimated that they are responsible for the demise of over 17 million people annually. The impact of these diseases is greater in the developing countries. People with compromised immune systems and children are the most affected. Infectious diseases may be caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The treatment of infectious diseases is hampered by simultaneous resistance to multiple drugs, indicating that there is a serious and pressing need to develop new therapeutics that can overcome drug resistance. This review will focus on the recent reports of metal-based nanoparticles that are potential therapeutics for the treatment of infectious diseases and their biological efficacy (in vitro and in vivo).

  • Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Swine at Agricultural Fairs and Transmission to Humans, Michigan and Ohio, USA, 2016.
    Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Swine at Agricultural Fairs and Transmission to Humans, Michigan and Ohio, USA, 2016. [Journal Article]Emerg Infect Dis 2017 Sep; 23(9):1551-1555.EIBowman AS, Walia RR, Nolting JM, et al. In 2016, a total of 18 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) virus occurred after exposure to influenza-infected swine at 7 agricultural fairs. Sixteen of these cases were the result of infection by ...In 2016, a total of 18 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) virus occurred after exposure to influenza-infected swine at 7 agricultural fairs. Sixteen of these cases were the result of infection by a reassorted virus with increasing prevalence among US swine containing a hemagglutinin gene from 2010-11 human seasonal H3N2 strains.

  • Serologic Evidence for Influenza C and D Virus among Ruminants and Camelids, Africa, 1991-2015.
    Serologic Evidence for Influenza C and D Virus among Ruminants and Camelids, Africa, 1991-2015. [Journal Article]Emerg Infect Dis 2017 Sep; 23(9):1556-1559.EISalem E, Cook EAJ, Lbacha HA, et al. Influenza D virus has been identified in America, Europe, and Asia. We detected influenza D virus antibodies in cattle and small ruminants from North (Morocco) and West (Togo and Benin) Africa. Dromeda...Influenza D virus has been identified in America, Europe, and Asia. We detected influenza D virus antibodies in cattle and small ruminants from North (Morocco) and West (Togo and Benin) Africa. Dromedary camels in Kenya harbored influenza C or D virus antibodies, indicating a potential new host for these viruses.

  • Risk for Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus on Poultry Farms, the Netherlands, 2007-2013.
    Risk for Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus on Poultry Farms, the Netherlands, 2007-2013. [Journal Article]Emerg Infect Dis 2017 Sep; 23(9):1510-1516.EIBouwstra R, Gonzales JL, de Wit S, et al. Using annual serologic surveillance data from all poultry farms in the Netherlands during 2007-2013, we quantified the risk for the introduction of low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) in di...Using annual serologic surveillance data from all poultry farms in the Netherlands during 2007-2013, we quantified the risk for the introduction of low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) in different types of poultry production farms and putative spatial-environmental risk factors: distance from poultry farms to clay soil, waterways, and wild waterfowl areas. Outdoor-layer, turkey (meat and breeder), and duck (meat and breeder) farms had a significantly higher risk for LPAIV introduction than did indoor-layer farms. Except for outdoor-layer, all poultry types (i.e., broilers, chicken breeders, ducks, and turkeys) are kept indoors. For all production types, LPAIV risk decreased significantly with increasing distance to medium-sized waterways and with increasing distance to areas with defined wild waterfowl, but only for outdoor-layer and turkey farms. Future research should focus not only on production types but also on distance to waterways and wild bird areas. In addition, settlement of new poultry farms in high-risk areas should be discouraged.

  • Human cases of influenza at the human-animal interface, January 2015–April 2017.
    Human cases of influenza at the human-animal interface, January 2015–April 2017. [Journal Article]Wkly Epidemiol Rec 2017 08 18; 92(33):460-75.WE

  • Identification of Polo-like kinases as potential novel drug targets for influenza A virus.
    Identification of Polo-like kinases as potential novel drug targets for influenza A virus. [Journal Article]Sci Rep 2017 Aug 17; 7(1):8629.SRPohl MO, von Recum-Knepper J, Rodriguez-Frandsen A, et al. In recent years genome-wide RNAi screens have revealed hundreds of cellular factors required for influenza virus infections in human cells. The long-term goal is to establish some of them as drug targe...In recent years genome-wide RNAi screens have revealed hundreds of cellular factors required for influenza virus infections in human cells. The long-term goal is to establish some of them as drug targets for the development of the next generation of antivirals against influenza. We found that several members of the polo-like kinases (PLK), a family of serine/threonine kinases with well-known roles in cell cycle regulation, were identified as hits in four different RNAi screens and we therefore studied their potential as drug target for influenza. We show that knockdown of PLK1, PLK3, and PLK4, as well as inhibition of PLK kinase activity by four different compounds, leads to reduced influenza virus replication, and we map the requirement of PLK activity to early stages of the viral replication cycle. We also tested the impact of the PLK inhibitor BI2536 on influenza virus replication in a human lung tissue culture model and observed strong inhibition of virus replication with no measurable toxicity. This study establishes the PLKs as potential drug targets for influenza and contributes to a more detailed understanding of the intricate interactions between influenza viruses and their host cells.

  • Unusual case of bilateral hand weakness.
    Unusual case of bilateral hand weakness. [Journal Article]Pract Neurol 2017 Aug 17.PNDatta S, Cosgrove J, Alam T, et al. A 35-year-old man presented with myalgia and bilateral hand weakness, 3 days after the onset of lethargy, fevers and rigours. The hand weakness caused functional impairment including difficulty pressin...A 35-year-old man presented with myalgia and bilateral hand weakness, 3 days after the onset of lethargy, fevers and rigours. The hand weakness caused functional impairment including difficulty pressing keys on his mobile phone. On examination, there was mild bilateral hand weakness with normal reflexes. His serum creatine kinase was mildly raised at 503 U/L (24-195), viral PCR throat swab was negative and electromyogram showed subtle myopathic changes in the distal forearm muscles. Nerve conduction studies found no evidence of neuropathy. Forced vital capacity was reduced on admission (1.5 L) but improved within 24 hours (2.3 L). We gave supportive intravenous fluids and his weakness improved within 48 hours. He was discharged and reported that the weakness had fully resolved within weeks. The diagnosis was viral myositis. Distal forearm myositis rarely follows H1N1 influenza in adults but is an important differential for postinfective neurological symptoms.

  • Insights From Flutracking: Thirteen Tips to Growing a Web-Based Participatory Surveillance System.
    Insights From Flutracking: Thirteen Tips to Growing a Web-Based Participatory Surveillance System. [Journal Article]JMIR Public Health Surveill 2017 Aug 17; 3(3):e48.JPDalton C, Carlson S, Butler M, et al. Flutracking is a weekly Web-based survey of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Australia that has grown from 400 participants in 2006 to over 26,000 participants every week in 2016. Flutracking monitors b...Flutracking is a weekly Web-based survey of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Australia that has grown from 400 participants in 2006 to over 26,000 participants every week in 2016. Flutracking monitors both the transmission and severity of ILI across Australia by documenting symptoms (cough, fever, and sore throat), time off work or normal duties, influenza vaccination status, laboratory testing for influenza, and health seeking behavior. Recruitment of Flutrackers commenced via health department and other organizational email systems, and then gradually incorporated social media promotion and invitations from existing Flutrackers to friends to enhance participation. Invitations from existing participants typically contribute to over 1000 new participants each year. The Flutracking survey link was emailed every Monday morning in winter and took less than 10 seconds to complete. To reduce the burden on respondents, we collected only a minimal amount of demographic and weekly data. Additionally, to optimize users' experiences, we maintained a strong focus on "obvious design" and repeated usability testing of naïve and current participants of the survey. In this paper, we share these and other insights on recruitment methods and user experience principles that have enabled Flutracking to become one of the largest online participatory surveillance systems in the world. There is still much that could be enhanced in Flutracking; however, we believe these principles could benefit others developing similar online surveillance systems.

  • Multi-center evaluation of the cobas(®) Liat(®) Influenza A/B & RSV assay for rapid point of care diagnosis.
    Multi-center evaluation of the cobas(®) Liat(®) Influenza A/B & RSV assay for rapid point of care diagnosis. [Journal Article]J Clin Virol 2017 Aug 08.:5-9.JCGibson J, Schechter-Perkins EM, Mitchell P, et al. Point of Care Testing (POCT) provides the capability for rapid laboratory test results in patient care environments where a traditional clinical laboratory is not available. POCTs have shorter turn-aro...Point of Care Testing (POCT) provides the capability for rapid laboratory test results in patient care environments where a traditional clinical laboratory is not available. POCTs have shorter turn-around times (TATs), they may be performed by non-laboratory personnel, and the need for transport time is eliminated. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted Clinical Laboratory Improvements Amendment (CLIA) waiver status to the cobas(®) Influenza A/B & RSV assay, a rapid, accurate point-of-care test for Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) performed on the Liat(®) System. The performance characteristics of this test were determined though a multi-site study consisting of different point of care testing environments. Prospectively collected Nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs from 1361 patients seen at 8 primary care clinics and 4 emergency departments (EDs) and 295 retrospectively identified specimens were tested for Influenza A/B and RSV on the cobas(®) Liat(®) platform. Performance characteristics were determined through comparison to ProFlu+, a laboratory-based PCR test for Influenza A/B and RSV (reference test). Discordant specimens were adjudicated following bi-directional sequencing. The cobas(®) Influenza A/B and RSV assay showed sensitivities of 99.6%, 99.3%, and 96.8% for Influenza A, Influenza B, and RSV, respectively as determined from percent positive agreement (PPA) following comparison to the reference test. Sequencing confirmed cobas(®) Influenza A/B and RSV results in 49.2% of reference test discordant specimens, while crossing threshold data suggest increased sensitivity compared to the reference test. The cobas(®) Influenza A/B and RSV assay was found to be a rapid, sensitive POCT for the detection of these viruses, and provides laboratory-quality PCR-based diagnostic results in point of care settings.

  • Early estimates of 2016/17 seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness in primary care in France.
    Early estimates of 2016/17 seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness in primary care in France. [Journal Article]J Clin Virol 2017 Aug 09.:1-4.JCSouty C, Vilcu AM, Capai L, et al. The moderate 2016/17 IVE estimates were higher than those estimated during influenza A(H3N2) epidemics with vaccine mismatch.The ongoing 2016/17 influenza epidemic in France is characterized by the circulation of A(H3N2) viruses, known to cause more severe illness among at risk populations.The purpose of our study was to provide early influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) estimates for the ongoing influenza epidemic in France and compare these estimates over the six post-pandemic IVE.We used clinical and virological data collected in primary care by the French Sentinelles network. IVE in preventing influenza infection was estimated by the test-negative design method. The screening method was used to estimate IVE in preventing medically-attended influenza-like illness among target groups (<65year with chronic diseases and ≥65 years) since 2010/11 influenza epidemic.Early IVE estimates in primary care against influenza A(H3N2) were 48% (95% confidence interval (CI): 22-66) overall and 39% (95% CI: -17 to 69) among elderly (aged 65 and older). In comparison to the last six epidemics, 2016/17 early IVE in preventing influenza-like illness among target groups showed VE estimates higher to those reported during the 2011/12 and 2014/15 epidemics.The moderate 2016/17 IVE estimates were higher than those estimated during influenza A(H3N2) epidemics with vaccine mismatch.

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus Articles

Overview of latest articles and publications on the Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in PubMed. PubMed is a service of the US National Library of Medicine that includes over 18 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals.